McKenzie Caddis Wet Fly

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the McKenizie Caddis Wet Fly.

McKenzie Caddis Wet Fly | www.johnkreft.comThis is the companion fly to last week’s TBT fly – the McKenzie Caddis Dry Fly.

As I mentioned in last week’s post, I found these fly patterns from the Caddis Fly Shop in Eugene, OR probably in the 1980’s.

These caddis flies begin hatching in mid-May and is a major hatch anticipated by many fly fishers. And they are big! Females can be in the #8 – 10 range, while males will be a little smaller in size 10 – 12. 

So if you live in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, you better have a few of these bugs in your fly box.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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McKenzie Caddis Dry Fly

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the McKenzie Caddis dry fly.

McKenzie Caddis Dry Fly | www.johnkreft.com

This odd looking body color matches the real insect found on the McKenzie River in Oregon. I found this fly pattern in the 1980’s when I tied a few of these flies for the first time.

These caddis flies begin hatching in mid-May and is a major hatch anticipated by many fly fishers. And they are big! Females can be in the #8 – 10 range, while males will be a little smaller in size 10 – 12. 

So if you live in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, you better have a few of these bugs in your fly box.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Griffith’s Gnat Emerger

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Griffith’s Gnat Emerger.

Griffith's Gnat Emerger Peacock Version | www.johnkreft.com

This is another great fly pattern from Craig Mathews at Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone, MT. He created a variant of the Griffith’s Gnat with his Zelon Midge and the result was the Griffith’s Gnat Emerger.

If you are a frequent RiverKeeper Flies reader, you surely recognize Craig’s name along with Blue Ribbon Flies. I have many of their fly patterns on the website. In addition, I wrote a couple of blogs – Craig Mathews and Blue Ribbon Flies and Craig Mathews Winter Seminar which includes pictures of flies he tied. Both of these posts are popular here at RiverKeeper Flies. Continue reading

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Poxyback Baetis

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Poxyback Baetis.

Poxyback Baetis | www.johnkreft.com

This is an older fly pattern I found in Randall Kaufmann’s book Tying Nymphs (1994). Kaufmann’s book, along with his Tying Dry Flies, was one of the first color fly tying books I purchased.

Tying Nymphs taught me new techniques, materials, and flies to tie.

The Poxyback fly series were designed by Mike Mercer from Redding, CA and included PMDs, Callibaetis, Green Drakes. A drop of epoxy was used on top of the thorax to simulate one of the “trigger features” that make fish respond to take a natural. Just before hatching, the real bugs develop a shiny, distended wingcase. Mercer determined a drop of epoxy would replicate the wingcase.

This fly was tied on a Tiemco 200 #18 hook. I used UV resin instead of epoxy. It’s much simpler than mixing and waiting for the epoxy to set.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Medallion Biot Wet Fly

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Medallion Biot Wet Fly.

Medallion Biot Wet Fly | www.johnkreft.com

I selected this fly to continue the theme of biot flies I presented in the Goose and Turkey Biot Flies post this week.

The Medallion Biot Wet Fly is another fly by Shane Stalcup and can be tied in different sizes and colors to imitate a variety of mayflies. Shane’s fly pattern can be tied in sizes 8 – 16 in olive, tan, and gray. He suggests fishing this fly in the upper part of the rough waters to imitate a drowned adult mayfly.

This is one of the first flies I saw using Medallion sheeting for wings. If you like the look of this fly, be sure to check out additional fly patterns in Stalcup’s book Mayflies “Top to Bottom” (2002).

For more about Shane, see the Stalcup CDC Loop Wing Emerger Throw Back Thursday Fly post.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Stalcup CDC Loop Wing Emerger

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Stalcup CDC Loop Wing Emerger.

Stalcup CDC Loop Wing Emerger | www.johnkreft.com

This fly was the creation of Shane Stalcup, a talented and innovative fly tyer. The fly pattern sheet can be found HERE.

I first learned of Stalcup’s flies in his book Mayflies “Top to Bottom” (2002). I thought it was interesting looking at the materials he used to create close imitations to the real insects. It was the first time I had heard of Medallion sheeting. It wasn’t long before I had that material in several colors. Many of the flies in his book used biots for bodies. This fly is no exception.

Stalcup created some wonderful fly tying videos and those videos can now be seen on my friend John Sherry’s Youtube NetKnots Fly Tying channel. I encourage you to take a look. Be sure to check out his video of the Stalcup CDC Loop Wing Emerger.

Unfortunately, Shane passed away prematurely in 2011 at the age of 48.

Many of his flies can still be purchased in your local fly shop. You might give them a try. Watch a video or two of Shane tying his flies. You’ll see how “fishy” they really are.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Old Fly Fishing and Fly Tying Books

Have you ever wondered about the history of fly fishing? It’s an interesting topic to me, which explains why I’ve been reading old fly fishing and fly tying books lately. Why? First, they are a source for my Throw Back Thursday Flies. Secondly, I wonder how previous generations fished and what some of their streamside conversations were.

Favorite Flies and Their Histories | www.johnkreft.com

I always enjoyed reading the Pioneers & Legends stories in NW Fly Fishing Magazine. John Shewey, the magazine’s editor, writes some of these articles. It’s one of the reasons I purchased his books Classic Steelhead Flies and Spey Flies & Dee Flies, Their History & Construction to read more about our fly fishing history. Continue reading

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