Black Bivisible

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Black Bivisible.

Black Bivisible | www.johnkreft.com

This fly was from a collection of flies tied by Dan Bailey. I was fortunate to be able to photograph a total of nine Bailey flies – a Blonde Wulff, Mosquito, Light Cahill, Grey Hackle, Dark Cahill, Ginger Quill, Black Gnat, Fan Wing Royal Coachman, and this Black Bivisible. I hope to tell more about these flies in the future. Continue reading

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The North Country Purple Partridge Soft Hackle

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the North Country Purple Partridge soft hackle.

Purple Partridge | www.johnkreft.com

I received a new book a few weeks ago, The North Country Fly: Yorkshire’s Soft Hackle Tradition by Robert L. Smith. It’s a terrific book. A friend had loaned me his copy about a year ago and I read most of the book. I liked it so well, I just purchased my own copy from The Rogue Anglers website.

I found the Purple Partridge soft hackle listed with John William Binns (1860 – 1907). So it’s an old fly pattern.

I’ve tied a lot of soft hackle flies, including my RiverKeeper Soft Hackle Cripple. I learned through the book a new “fly-dressing” technique. Many North Country flies were tied what I think is backward. At least how I learned to tie flies. The head is tied first, followed by the hackle, then finished with silk thread for the body.

I’ve been meaning to tie up a few different old soft hackle fly patterns and include them as Throw Back Thursday flies. There’s something about simple flies I find remarkable. How many years have passed since this fly was created and how many fish has it caught?

They work. Silk thread. Partridge wing. Peacock herl head. Simple, but beautiful.

You better tie some and fish them.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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The Bekeart Special

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Bekeart Special.

Bekeart's Special | www.johnkreft.com

It’s been awhile since I highlighted a steelhead fly. I found the Bekeart Special steelhead fly pattern in John Shewey’s book entitled Classic Steelhead Flies. If you haven’t had a chance to peruse this book, go to your local fly shop and see if they have it in stock. Otherwise, go to the link above and order it. You won’t be sorry.

Philip Bekeart was the son of Frank Bekeart who relocated to California from New York City to make his fortune in the California Gold Rush. Well, that didn’t work out too well, so Frank moved to San Francisco where he worked as a gunsmith. Philip bought the business from his father in 1890. He was well known for his target weapons and was a competitive shooter too.

Shewey offers more information about Bekeart’s gun prowess and the fact he was a well-known hunter and angler. Shewey references the book Trout Flies (1932) where the author, A. Courtney Williams stated the Bekeart Special was created by Bekeart. 

Shewey also makes a case that John Benn, one of the better known fly tyer’s at that time who lived in the Bay Area, may have created the fly and named it for Bekeart. Benn was known to be a prolific fly tyer and frequently named flies for people.

To find out the whole story, be sure to read it in Classic Steelhead Flies.

For more about John Benn, be sure to read my post – Benn’s Coachman.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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The Brown Turkey

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Brown Turkey, another fly from the Ray Bergman collection.

The Brown Turkey | www.johnkreft.com

Since Thursday is Thanksgiving, the Brown Turkey was an obvious choice to highlight as this week’s TBT fly.

For some reason, I just like the elegance and simplicity of a Bergman wet fly. You can find the Brown Turkey wet fly on Plate No. 2, page 38 of Bergman’s book entitled Trout. 

If you are a regular at RiverKeeper Flies, you recall Bergman’s book includes colored plates to illustrate the dry and wet flies with a description of each fly in the back. It was the first book to provide color fly illustrations.

Here are a few other Ray Bergman flies I’ve included as Throw Back Thursday Flies: the Arthur Hoyt, the Babcock, the Blue Bottle, the Bostwick, the Bouncer, the Chantry, the Darling, the Mark Lain, the Mrs. Haase, the Rio Grande King, the Loyal Sock, the Silver Stork, the Walla-Walla, the Whirling Dun, and the Wilson Ant. (An easy method of finding all of them is to click on the words “Ray Bergman Flies” under CATEGORIES in the right-hand column on this page.)

The Brown Turkey

Tail:

Brown turkey

Body:

Brown floss

Hackle:

Brown (palmered)

Wing:

Brown turkey

Fly pattern as listed in Trout. This fly was tied on an older Mustad 3906 hook, size 10. 

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Dotterel

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Dotterel.

Dotterel | www.johnkreft.com

This is another fly I found while reading Mike Valla’s book entitled The Founding Flies – 43 American Masters, Their Patterns and Influences.

It was interesting to me as I read about Thaddeus Norris (1811 – 1878). He authored The American Angler’s Book (1864) and American Fish Culture (1868) and had a significant impact of fly fishing in America. Norris recognized the difference between British and American stream, rivers, and lakes as well as the insects that inhabited them. Most of the fly patterns used in America before Norris’s work were from England. 

Continue reading

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Royal Wulff TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Royal Wulff TBT.

Original Royal Wulff | www.johnkreft.com

This is another fly I found while reading Mike Valla’s terrific book entitled The Founding Flies – 43 American Masters, Their Patterns and Influences.

Lee Wulff (1905 – 1991) created the Royal Wulff in 1930 along with the Gray Wulff and White Wulff. The Gray Wulff was the first of the series. He fished all three fly patterns on the Esopus River in the Catskill mountains of New York with his friend Dan Bailey who would eventually move to Montana and open Dan Bailey’s Fly Shop. Continue reading

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Mamba Black Rufus TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is a Mamba Black Rufus TBT.

Mamba Black Rufus | www.johnkreft.com

The Mamba Black Rufus TBT is a local fly pattern developed by Bob Gaviglio of Sunriver Fly Shop in Sunriver, OR.

There is a series of Rufus flies, including the CJ Rufus, Brown Leech Rufus, Mamba Burnt Orange Rufus, and a Brookie Rufus to name a few. I’m guessing the CJ Rufus was named for someone who wanted a little different color and hammered some fish…just a guess, but I really don’t know.

Tied originally in the early 1990’s, the Rufus was developed for the Lower Deschutes River, OR.

Bob recommends this fly as a searcher pattern, when no visible hatch can be seen.

To fish the Rufus, use a start and stop retrieve. As the fly stops, the bead makes it dive head first and imitates a leech, dragonfly nymph or baitfish trying to escape.

Don’t limit fishing the Mamba Black Rufus TBT to lakes only. Give it a try for river rainbows and steelhead in clear water. In fact, it works in most Central Oregon waters.

Enjoy…go fish!

 
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CDC & Elk TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the CDC & Elk TBT.

CDC & Elk | www.johnkreft.com

The CDC & Elk is a fly Hans Weilenmann created in 1992. It combines the proven properties of an Elk Hair Caddis developed by Al Troth with CDC feathers for the body and “hackle”.

I tied my first CDC & Elk flies after completing the research for my post about the different CDC feathers, entitled Use Fly Patterns with CDC Feathers.

If you’d like more information about the CDC & Elk TBT fly, click HERE to read it in Hans’ own words.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

 

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