Circus Peanut Articulated Streamer

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Circus Peanut Articulated Streamer.

Circus Peanut | www.johnkreft.comI stayed at Slide Inn on the Madison River recently during our 2017 fly fishing road trip. One afternoon, I went to the fly shop and talked with Kelly about my Throw Back Thursday Fly feature and asked him if I could take pictures of a few of his flies. He graciously agreed and began telling me stories about his flies. Continue reading

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Galloup’s T & A Leech

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is Galloup’s T & A Leech.

Galloup's T & A Leech | www.johnkreft.com

I stayed at Galloup’s Slide Inn last week during our 2017 fly fishing road trip and had the opportunity to talk with Kelly about a few of his early fly patterns. I told him about my RiverKeeper Flies Throw Back Thursday fly feature and he began telling me stories about how several of his flies were developed. Continue reading

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Galloup’s Zoo Cougar

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is Galloup’s Zoo Cougar.

Galloup's Zoo Cougar | www.johnkreft.com

Since I’m staying at Slide Inn on the Madison River this week, I thought it appropriate to feature a few of Kelly’s flies for my Throw Back Thursday Fly feature. I spent some time with him at the shop taking photos of a few of his famous flies and hearing a stories of them as well. You’ll be seeing a few more of his flies in future TBT posts. 

Galloup developed this fly in the mid-1990’s for the Manistee River in Michigan where his first fly shop, the Troutsman fly shop was located. He told me he purchased the Slide Inn on the Madison River in 2001 and moved to Montana in 2002. 

He is the author of Cripples and Spinners (2001) and co-author of Modern Streamers for Trophy Trout (2004) with Bob Linsenman.

Kelly is a stickler for detail and has developed a well-earned reputation for quality flies. If you are a streamer fly fisher, be sure to purchase some of his flies at Galloup’s Slide Inn.

Zoo Cougars in Various Colors | www.johnkreft.com

Here is a picture the Galloup’s Zoo Cougar from the fly bin at the Slide Inn Fly Shop. Kelly ties and sells them in black, olive, white, tan, gray, golden brown and yellow; sizes 2 – 6.

If you are into streamer fishing, be sure to order a few Galloup’s Zoo Cougar flies from his shop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Clouser Minnow

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Clouser Minnow.

Clouser Minnow | www.johnkreft.com

This Clouser Minnow is one a friend gave me a couple of years ago.

Bob Clouser invented the Clouser Minnow in 1987 to imitate smallmouth bass on the Susquehanna River.

My quick research found the fly was named by Lefty Kreh as the Clouser Deep Minnow. He used the fly in fresh and saltwater and has caught over 87 species of game fish using the fly.

A #2 saltwater hook was used for the original fly with a white bucktail belly, gold Krystal Flash and natural brown bucktail for the wing. The other color was tied with white bucktail for the belly, silver Krystal Flash, and gray-dyed bucktail.

The Clouser Minnow can be tied in a other popular colors including tan and white, white and black, chartreuse and white, and brown and white.

Tying the eyes on the bottom of the hook inverts the fly so it doesn’t hang up on the bottom. In addition, the heavy eyes cause the fly to have a jigging motion when fished.

The Clouser Minnow is still a very popular streamer pattern. If you haven’t tried one, you’re missing out!

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Metolius River Bull Trout, Bamboo and Christmas

I had a difficult time creating today’s post title of Metolius River Bull Trout, Bamboo and Christmas. Too many things to talk about. Did you think I might have used a bamboo rod to fish for Bull Trout? Read on and it will all make sense.

I’m into bonus fishing time. I’ve always said the fishing slows considerably after November 1, but the weather hasn’t turned yet this year. Temperatures have been in the lower 60’s on some days. In fact as I write this, the forecast is for a high of 67 today. Is it really NOVEMBER?

Sure, the dry fly fishing has slowed a little, but there’s still fish to be had.

And sometimes I decide to try my hand at coaxing a Bull Trout onto my fly.

Holding Metolius River Bull Trout | www.johnkreft.com

I thought this picture would get your attention! Continue reading

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Spruce Peacock

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Spruce Peacock, a fly pattern developed by Polly Rosborough.

Spruce Peacock | www.johnkreft.com

I found this fly on a display at the International Federation of Fly Fishers Museum in Livingston, MT. I took this picture of Polly’s Spruce Peacock through the glass display in a dark room and I think it turned out quite well. It’s is one of several flies in a display entitled Polly’s Proven Killers.

The Spruce Peacock appears to be a variation of the Spruce Fly, originally developed in the 1930’s by Don Godfrey to catch sea-run cutthroat trout on the Oregon coast.

Ernest H. “Polly” Rosborough (1902 – 1997) tied a large variety of flies but is probably best known as an author of Tying and Fishing the Fuzzy Nymph (1965). Polly lived in Chiloquin, Oregon and his home river was the Williamson River. 

Here are a couple other TBT Rosborough flies – the Dark Caddis and his Grasshopper

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Stayner Ducktail TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Stayner Ducktail TBT.

Stayner Ducktail | www.johnkreft.com

Ruel Stayner of Twin Falls, ID created this bait fish fly pattern to imitate bait fish in the lakes and reservoirs he fished.

Stayner owned and operated a sporting goods store in Twin Falls and created this fly in the late 1960’s. He attempted to create a fly to imitate perch fry in Idaho’s Magic Reservoir.

Seasoned anglers in Idaho also use the Stayner Ducktail streamer as well. Others have used it all over the world to imitate shiner minnows as well as trout fry.

My friend Jim Fisher, a noted fly tyer in his own right, tied this fly for me and I thought it a perfect fly to feature as a Throw Back Thursday Fly. Jim was the 2011 Stan Walters Memorial Tyer of the Year. The Oregon Council of the International Federation of Fly Fishers awards this annually “in recognition of your skills, teaching, and innovation in the art of fly tying.”

When I first looked at the fly, it reminded me of a streamer fly pattern I learned in the 1980’s when fishing the Metolius, something we called a Stovepipe.

I think I might have to tie up a few of the Stayner Ducktail this winter.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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What Are the Fish Eating

I’m fortunate to be able to fish over 100 days per year. Why did I begin this week’s post with that statement? Well, spending that much time on the water has changed the way I fish in the last 10 years. I observe the water more. The result is I’m able to see fish rising to hatching bugs. So I’ve turned into a dry fly fisherman. And when they don’t rise to my flies, I ask what are the fish eating?

For some reason, I’m asking that question more and more these days and it leads me to tie more flies to try on these hard to catch fish. Here is my most recent fly.

Four Midges | www.johnkreft.com

It’s a simple #22 Parachute Midge Emerger, otherwise known as a “beta” fly, meaning I’m testing the fly to see if I should add it to the RiverKeeper Flies Fly Patterns. Continue reading

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Muddler Minnow

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Muddler Minnow. Muddlers imitate various bait fish, namely sculpins.

Muddler Minnow | www.johnkreft.com

 

This is a fly I tied many years ago…a feeble attempt at best.

The development of the Muddler Minnow was attributed to Don Gapen of Anoka, Minnesota in 1937. Don’s parents ran the Gateway Lodge Resort on the shore of Hungry Jack Lake. A second resort was opened on the Nipigon River in Ontario called the Chalet Bungalow Lodge. Evidently, Don developed the Muddler there to catch brook trout. After that, the fly reached legendary status as it was popularized in Montana and now everyone knows about it.

I have to be honest, I haven’t fished this fly much. I really don’t fish many streamers except an occasional attempt trying to hook up on a Bull Trout in the Metolius. But I know many fly fishers do and swear by it.

Maybe you have.

 

Check out the Galleries tab on the menu bar for an easy way to view all the Throw Back Thursday Flies pictures.

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