Benn’s Coachman

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is Benn’s Coachman, a fly developed by John Benn (1838 – 1907) in the 1890s.

Benn's Coachman | www.johnkreft.com

Since I’ve been working with red and white married wings for the Green Butt Skunk Spey, I decided to use a fly from John Shewey’s book Classic Steelhead Flies. Benn’s Coachman seemed appropriate. Continue reading

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Still Working on Spey Flies

I haven’t tied any trout flies in the last week because I’m still working on spey flies. Specifically, the Green Butt Skunk Spey.

Green Butt Skunk Spey Flies on Book | www.johnkreft.com

The two flies on the book Steelhead Flies by John Shewey are the first (left side) and third (right side) I’ve tied. You’ll find this fly on page 193 of John’s book.

I asked for and received some feedback from a couple of fly tying friends of mine and I’m incorporating their comments into the next few flies coming off my vise.

“As a fishing fly it is great!  It is still pretty good for the wall.  Being real critical…” Continue reading

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Black Prince TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Black Prince TBT…the Clarence Gordon version.

Black Prince | www.johnkreft.com

This is another steelhead fly pattern from John Shewey’s Classic Steelhead Flies. If you haven’t had a chance to peruse this book, go to your local fly shop and see if they have it in stock. Otherwise, go to the link above and order it. You won’t be sorry.

John tells a great story about learning the originator of the fly from Frank Moore he calls “the legend of the North Umpqua.” It was developed by Clarence Gordon.

To learn more about Clarence Gordon and how he made his impact on North Umpqua and Steamboat Inn, be sure to read the Throw Back Thursday Fly post about the Black Gordon.

Have any Black Prince flies in your steelhead fly box?

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Steelhead Bee TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Steelhead Bee TBT, a fly tied by Roderick Haig-Brown (1908 – 1976).

Steelhead Bee | www.johnkreft.com

I found this fly on a display at the International Federation of Fly Fishers Museum in Livingston, MT. It’s is one of several flies in a display entitled Roderick Haig-Brown His Tackle & His Flies.

I took this picture of the Steelhead Bee through the glass display in a dark room and I think it turned out quite well. It was one of several flies in the collection.

Be sure to check out my other Throw Back Thursday Fly posts of Haig-Brown flies, the Silver LadySilver Brown, and the Golden Girl.

Roderick Haig-Brown was born in England and spent his early years there, moving to Seattle, Washington to live with an uncle when 17 and worked in logging camps. He went to British Columbia when his US visa expired and worked as a logger, commercial fisherman, and guide. Haig-Brown returned to London in 1931, but soon returned to British Columbia where he later married his wife Ann and both of them settled into their home on the Campbell River on Vancouver Island. He lived on the Campbell River for the remainder of his life.

Haig-Brown was a prolific writer, publishing 23 books along with numerous articles and essays. His first book Silver: The Life of an Atlantic Salmon was published in 1931. Other favorite titles include Return to the River (1941), A River Never Sleeps (1946), Fisherman’s Spring (1951), Fisherman’s Winter (1954), Fisherman’s Summer (1959), and Fisherman’s Fall (1964).

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Golden Girl TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Golden Girl TBT, a fly tied by Roderick Haig-Brown (1908 – 1976).

Golden Girl | www.johnkreft.com

I took this picture of the Golden Girl through the glass display in a dark room and I think it turned out quite well. It was one of several flies in the collection and I plan to post other flies in future TBT posts.

The Golden Girl was developed by Haig-Brown in the 1940’s for winter steelhead in the streams and rivers of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Art Lingren in his book Fly Patterns of British Columbia provides a good history of the Golden Girl and how the fly was developed. He states, Haig-Brown was serving in World War II and dreaming about steelhead fishing. He believed the colors of red and orange were important for winter steelhead. Looking for a simpler fly than the Atlantic salmon flies of his native country, he used the the Red Sandy and Durham Ranger as impetus for a new fly pattern. The result was a much simpler fly using the best parts of each fly – the slim body of the Red Sandy and golden pheasant tippet wing of the Durham Ranger.  Continue reading

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Silver Brown – TBT

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Silver Brown – TBT, a fly tied by Roderick Haig-Brown (1908 – 1976).

Silver Brown

I took this picture of the Silver Brown through the glass display in a dark room and I think it turned out quite well. It was one of several flies in the collection and I plan to post other flies in future TBT posts.

The Silver Brown was developed by Haig-Brown in the 1930’s for sea-run cutthroat and later used for summer-run steelhead and coho salmon in the streams and rivers of Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Roderick Haig-Brown was born in England and spent his early years there, moving to Seattle, Washington to live with an uncle in his early 20’s and worked in logging camps. He went to British Columbia when his US visa expired and worked as a logger, commercial fisherman, and guide. Haig-Brown returned to London in 1931, but soon returned to British Columbia where he later married his wife Ann and both of them settled into their home on the Campbell River on Vancouver Island. He lived on the Campbell River for the remainder of his life.

Haig-Brown was a prolific writer, publishing 23 books along with numerous articles and essays. His first book Silver: The Life of an Atlantic Salmon was published in 1931. Other favorite titles include Return to the River (1941), A River Never Sleeps(1946), Fisherman’s Spring (1951), Fisherman’s Winter (1954), Fisherman’s Summer(1959), and Fisherman’s Fall (1964).

Be sure to check out my other TBT Haig-Brown post, the Silver Lady.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Steelhead Caddis

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Steelhead Caddis.

Steelhead Caddis | www.johnkreft.com

The Steelhead Caddis was created by Bill McMillan in 1975 as a low-water variation of the Muddler Minnow. This fly is fished dry on the surface with a trailing wake, making a comotion to get the steelhead’s attention. Use a riffling hitch or cast the fly downstream and use a tight line to lead the fly across the river with your rod.

I pulled this fly out of one of my steelhead fly boxes. It’s a little worn from being used a few times, but it hasn’t caught a steelhead. I’m not sure how I would react to a big sea-run rainbow trout rising to take this fly, but I’d sure like to find out! It’s one of my dreams for that to happen.

I haven’t tied any of the Steelhead Caddis, but perhaps I should tie a few up.

Enjoy…go fish! 

 

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Del Cooper

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Del Cooper.

Del Cooper | www.johnkreft.com

I’ve been reading John Shewey’s Classic Steelhead Flies and decided to look in my Steelhead fly box to see if I had a few of the flies. Low and behold, I found a couple Del Coopers. I must have tied this several years ago.

Shewey attributes the fly development to Mike Kennedy, a well known steelhead fly fisherman who cast flies to steelhead in Oregon and Washington. The fly was named for Del Cooper, a Portland angler and fly tyer. It was a popular fly for the North Santiam river in Oregon in the late 1980’s.

Yes, it may be a little early to take the fly out and fish for steelhead, but it won’t be long. 

Do you have any Del Cooper’s in your steelhead fly box?

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Jungle Dragon Steelhead Fly

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Jungle Dragon steelhead fly.

Jungle Dragon | www.johnkreft.com

For my birthday, I received a copy of John Shewey’s book entitled Classic Steelhead Flies and paging through the book, the Jungle Dragon spoke to me.

I’ve never heard of this steelhead fly. It was created by William Hosie in the 1950s, a Washington Fly Fishing Club member who taught the fly to fellow club members. Shewey writes there were two versions of the fly. I selected the version presented by Enos Bradner in the Seattle Sunday Times August 19, 1959 edition.

For more information about the Jungle Dragon, pick up a copy of Shewey’s Classic Steelhead Flies and read the rest of the story.

Jungle Dragon

Tag:

Silver flat tinsel

Tail:

Golden pheasant tippet

Body:

Flat silver tinsel (rear half) and red silk (front half)

Rib:

Silver oval tinsel

Hackle:

Grizzly

Wing:

Gray squirrel tail

Cheeks:

Jungle cock

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Black Gordon

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Black Gordon.

Black Gordon | www.johnkreft.com

I found this fly in one of my steelhead fly boxes and thought it would be a good candidate for a TBT Fly. The Black Gordon is a well-known steelhead fly pattern developed on the North Umpqua River in the 1930’s by Clarence Gordon, a great fisherman and guide. Gordon first travelled to the North Umpqua in 1929, returned to fish for several years and finally decide to build the North Umpqua Lodge on the site of Major Mott’s camp. Continue reading

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