Griffith’s Gnat Emerger

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Griffith’s Gnat Emerger.

Griffith's Gnat Emerger Peacock Version | www.johnkreft.com

This is another great fly pattern from Craig Mathews at Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone, MT. He created a variant of the Griffith’s Gnat with his Zelon Midge and the result was the Griffith’s Gnat Emerger.

If you are a frequent RiverKeeper Flies reader, you surely recognize Craig’s name along with Blue Ribbon Flies. I have many of their fly patterns on the website. In addition, I wrote a couple of blogs – Craig Mathews and Blue Ribbon Flies and Craig Mathews Winter Seminar which includes pictures of flies he tied. Both of these posts are popular here at RiverKeeper Flies. Continue reading

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Confusing Mayfly Names

Do you know the names of all the bugs you see on the river or lake? Do you need to know these names to catch fish? Not at all. Fly fishers have developed their own common names over the years for many bugs in order to share information about recent fishing trips. I have to say that I can identify a lot of bugs, but there are some confusing mayfly names that even I have difficulty with.

March Brown Adult | www.johnkreft.com

When I explain bugs to beginning fly fishers, I start with basic information about the three major bugs important to their fishing success. Stoneflies have wings flat along the top of their body. Caddisflies have a tent-shaped wing. Lastly, mayflies have upright wings which look like sailboats floating in the water. Knowing this basic information is a start for sharing with other fly fishers. Continue reading

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2107 Stan Walters Memorial Fly Tyer of the Year

Last week I was honored to receive the 2017 Stan Walters Memorial Fly Tyer of the Year at the NW Fly Tying & Fly Fishing Expo in Albany, OR. The annual award is presented by the Oregon Council of the International Federation of Fly Fishers “in recognition of your skills, teaching and innovation in the art of fly tying.”

2017 Stan Walter Memorial Fly Tyer of the Year | www.johnkreft.com

I was shocked when my name was called, but humbled to forever be part of this elite group of fly tyers as the 28th person to receive the award. The complete list of recipients is listed at the end of my post.  Continue reading

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Poxyback Baetis

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Poxyback Baetis.

Poxyback Baetis | www.johnkreft.com

This is an older fly pattern I found in Randall Kaufmann’s book Tying Nymphs (1994). Kaufmann’s book, along with his Tying Dry Flies, was one of the first color fly tying books I purchased.

Tying Nymphs taught me new techniques, materials, and flies to tie.

The Poxyback fly series were designed by Mike Mercer from Redding, CA and included PMDs, Callibaetis, Green Drakes. A drop of epoxy was used on top of the thorax to simulate one of the “trigger features” that make fish respond to take a natural. Just before hatching, the real bugs develop a shiny, distended wingcase. Mercer determined a drop of epoxy would replicate the wingcase.

This fly was tied on a Tiemco 200 #18 hook. I used UV resin instead of epoxy. It’s much simpler than mixing and waiting for the epoxy to set.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Die Hard Winter Fly Fisher

I’ve been out on the river only a couple of times since the first of the year. It’s that time of year when you decide if you’re a die hard winter fly fisher because many days the temperatures hover around 32 degrees or colder. March is the month of transition. Spring weather is right around the corner…I hope!

Here is a Baetis I found along the river a couple of weeks ago. It was in the shadows on snow crystals. It reminds me of pictures from Mt. Everest and the ice flows climbers must navigate. This little guy was doing the same.

Baetis on Snow Crystals | www.johnkreft.com

And speaking of snow, there is still a little snow on the river. But it’s certainly fishable. Here I am playing and landing a fish using a $3 Dip. Continue reading

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Medallion Biot Wet Fly

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Medallion Biot Wet Fly.

Medallion Biot Wet Fly | www.johnkreft.com

I selected this fly to continue the theme of biot flies I presented in the Goose and Turkey Biot Flies post this week.

The Medallion Biot Wet Fly is another fly by Shane Stalcup and can be tied in different sizes and colors to imitate a variety of mayflies. Shane’s fly pattern can be tied in sizes 8 – 16 in olive, tan, and gray. He suggests fishing this fly in the upper part of the rough waters to imitate a drowned adult mayfly.

This is one of the first flies I saw using Medallion sheeting for wings. If you like the look of this fly, be sure to check out additional fly patterns in Stalcup’s book Mayflies “Top to Bottom” (2002).

For more about Shane, see the Stalcup CDC Loop Wing Emerger Throw Back Thursday Fly post.

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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