LaFontaine Diving Blue-Winged Olive Egg Layer

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the LaFontaine Diving Blue-Winged Olive Egg Layer.

LaFontaine Diving Blue-Winged Olive Egg Layer | www.johnkreft.com

A friend of mine recently gave me this fly purportedly tied by Gary LaFontaine himself and I thought it would be a great candidate for a TBT fly.

To be honest, I didn’t really know much about the diving activity of the BWO. My fishing partner and I recently discussed the fact we haven’t seen BWO spinners on the water. We guessed it may be due to the fact the spinner fall happened in the evening or morning when we weren’t at the river or perhaps they’re so small we just couldn’t see them.

The first place I looked to find the LaFontaine Diving Blue-Winged Olive Egg Layer was in the book LaFontaine’s Legacy, written by my friends Al and Gretchen Beatty. And there it was along with a brief story about these mayflies swimming through the water to lay their eggs on the bottom. In fact, the males follow the females in their swimming venture. Isn’t nature amazing? Continue reading

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Favorite Salmonfly Patterns

The word on the street this week is Salmonflies are beginning to hatch. While it may be early for your river, these big bugs will be available for several weeks. So I thought I’d provide a few pictures of the real bug and offer some of my favorite Salmonfly patterns I plan to carry in my fly box.

Remember what they look like? These are the biggest bugs the fish in my area will see all year, so the fish usually go crazy when they’re around. Salmonflies range from size 6, with some stretching out to size 2!

Salmonfly adult|www.johnkreft.com

OK, now I have your attention! Continue reading

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Jungle Dragon Steelhead Fly

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Jungle Dragon steelhead fly.

Jungle Dragon | www.johnkreft.com

For my birthday, I received a copy of John Shewey’s book entitled Classic Steelhead Flies and paging through the book, the Jungle Dragon spoke to me.

I’ve never heard of this steelhead fly. It was created by William Hosie in the 1950s, a Washington Fly Fishing Club member who taught the fly to fellow club members. Shewey writes there were two versions of the fly. I selected the version presented by Enos Bradner in the Seattle Sunday Times August 19, 1959 edition.

For more information about the Jungle Dragon, pick up a copy of Shewey’s Classic Steelhead Flies and read the rest of the story.

Jungle Dragon

Tag:

Silver flat tinsel

Tail:

Golden pheasant tippet

Body:

Flat silver tinsel (rear half) and red silk (front half)

Rib:

Silver oval tinsel

Hackle:

Grizzly

Wing:

Gray squirrel tail

Cheeks:

Jungle cock

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Effective Dry Fly Patterns for Fast Water

I’ve had time for a little zen fly fishing lately. The weather has been beautiful, but the bugs aren’t showing up…hence the fish aren’t rising. Well, that gives me time to think about the types of dry flies I use and effective dry fly patterns for fast water.

A week or so ago, I wrote a post – Select the Right Dry Fly. I talked about the flies I use and the importance of having the right profile on the spring creek I fish.

But during a recent zen moment, I wondered how my fly choices might change if I fished bigger water like the Lower Deschutes. Would I use the same dry flies or different ones?

If I concentrated on fishing the eddies, I’d probably use the same dry fly patterns as those on a spring creek. I like the idea of lower profile flies.

What about the straight-ahead flows of faster riffles? My go-to flies might stay on top of the water for awhile, but they may get “drowned” too. And a higher profile fly would be easier to see. So with those thoughts, I’d have a few more choices in my fly box.

I’d use a lot more flies with hackle on them to help them float. Let’s just focus on the mayflies today.

Many of you know I fish the RiverKeeper Soft Hackle Cripple and Sparkle Duns most of the time. These patterns fit my theory about using simple, but effective flies.

So how about a few parachute fly patterns?

BWO PARACHUTE

BWO Parachute | www.johnkreft.com Continue reading

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The Chantry

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Chantry, another wet fly from the Ray Bergman collection in Trout.

Chantry | www.johnkreft.com

I found the Chantry on Plate 2, page 39.

For more information about Ray Bergman’s Trout, check out a previous Throw Back Thursday Fly, the Bostwick.

 

The Chantry

Body:

Peacock Herl

Tip:

Gold Tinsel

Hackle:

Black

Wing:

Dark Slate

This fly was tied on an older Mustad 3906 hook, size 10. 

Enjoy…go fish!

 

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Hatchmaster

This week’s Throw Back Thursday Fly is the Hatchmaster, a fly pattern developed in the 1930s.

Hatchmaster | www.johnkreft.com

Originally known as the Two-Feather Fly, it was created by Harry Darbee for a fisherman named Terrell Moore to solve a problem of getting large mayflies to land on the water softly and eliminate the bulk and weight. Some people called it the “Darbee”. Continue reading

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Odds and Ends

This week’s post is about the odds and ends that are happening as I look forward to the upcoming Spring fishing season.

I think I’m going through a little “free fall” this week. Ever hear the term? It’s what happens after you’ve been working at a high level for some time and then everything just ends, and your mind is trying to figure out what to do.

Damsel Debris

Damsel Debris | www.johnkreft.com

Sure, I’m getting out fishing a little, but I’m closing a couple of significant chapters – the 2016 NW Fly Tyer & Fly Fishing Expo and the Central Oregon Flyfisher’s (COF) Winter Fly Tying classes. Continue reading

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